Reports & Publications

The Quiet Revolution: Medicaid and SCHIP Coverage of Low-Income Children in Illinois

September 2004

Since the early 1990s, major policy changes at the national level have created a revolution in health care coverage for low-income children—most strikingly, a shift from welfare-based to income-based eligibility. This report, and the related policy brief, document how those changes have affected the enrollment of Illinois children in Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. They show the progress Illinois is making in enrolling children, the gap that remains between eligibility and enrollment, and the disparities between children who are covered and parents who are not.

Health Challenges, Policy Challenges: Medicaid and the Disabled in Illinois

September 2004

Disabled Medicaid beneficiaries in Illinois vary widely in age, health conditions, and personal circumstances. While they make up less than one-fifth of the state’s Medicaid enrollment, they account for more than half of the program’s spending. This report and policy brief examine enrollment and spending trends and the types of services used; they compare Illinois spending with that of other states and with nationwide trends. The documents provide useful background for discussions and decision-making about health care policy and coverage. 

Improving Access to Health and Mental Health for Chicago’s Deaf Community: A Survey of Deaf Adults

February 2004

Little research has been done to assess the special health-related needs of Deaf persons. To remedy this, Chicago’s two major providers of health services to Deaf patients—Sinai Health System and Advocate Health Care—collaborated on a health survey sensitive to the communication and cultural needs of the Deaf community. The project’s leaders believe the survey is the first of its kind conducted in American Sign Language.

Health Integration in Community Schools

January 2004

“Community schools” combine educational instruction with other vital services. They unite the most important influences in children’s lives—schools, families, and communities—to support learning and development. Many of Chicago’s community schools have identified health programming and services as important areas of need. To begin a process to help community schools address this need, Bank One, the Chicago Community Trust, Polk Bros. Foundation, and the Michael Reese Health Trust commissioned a report from Millennia Consulting.

Pediatric Community Reintegration Project

August 2003

When children are discharged from a rehabilitation hospital with physical or cognitive disabilities, they and their families face many challenges. In addition to accessing rehabilitative services, they often need support for returning to school, transportation to services and facilities, and help with functioning in their homes. This demonstration project sought to improve children’s transitions from inpatient rehabilitation centers back into their communities.

Pediatric Community Reintegration Project

August 2003

When children are discharged from a rehabilitation hospital with physical or cognitive disabilities, they and their families face many challenges. In addition to accessing rehabilitative services, they often need support for returning to school, transportation to services and facilities, and help with functioning in their homes. This demonstration project sought to improve children’s transitions from inpatient rehabilitation centers back into their communities.

Pediatric Asthma Intervention Project

September 2002

Chicago’s rate of hospitalization for asthma is more than twice the national average, and its mortality rate is among the highest in the nation. The costs are staggering: more than $1.4 billion a year in Illinois for direct costs related to asthma care. This project looked at the effects of different strategies for treating low-income, inner-city children with asthma, using reinforced patient/family education with and without case management. The report provides useful information about the impact on health outcomes and costs.

Sisters Speak Out: The Lives and Needs of Prostituted Women in Chicago

August 2002

The second study by the Center for Impact Research took a more in-depth look at women in various segments of the prostitution industry.  The report paints a stark portrait of their health needs.  For many, the challenges include violence, substance abuse, sexually-transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, mental health problems, homelessness, and chronic disease.  The report offers recommendations for an informed and effective response.

The Fund for Immigrants and Refugees

May 2002

In 1997, the Open Society Institute’s Emma Lazarus Fund challenged other funders to respond to the disproportionate impact of new welfare legislation on immigrants and refugees.  Twenty-seven Chicago-area funders took up the challenge, coming together as the Fund for Immigrants and Refugees.  The Michael Reese Health Trust contributed to the Fund, and members of our staff served on its Steering Committee.  The Health Trust was instrumental in ensuring that the health issues of immigrants and refugees remained a focus of the collaborative’s work. 

The Prostitution of Women and Girls in Metropolitan Chicago: A Preliminary Prevalence Report

May 2001

This was the first study ever to attempt to determine the number of girls and women involved in the sex trade in metropolitan Chicago:  not only street prostitution and off-street prostitution activities, but also the exchange of sex for drugs.  The report reveals an estimated 16,000 girls and women engaged in the prostitution industry.